Show respect in the details, part 1

June 5, 2018

I love children’s curiosity! LOVE it! I’ve learned so many interesting things because I was mother to a curious child. Continue reading “Show respect in the details, part 1”

Term paper time – help for the anxious

Screen Shot 2018-02-13 at 2.31.45 PM I’m completely sympathetic to anxious students struggling to even start papers for grades, and I never call it laziness. It may be debilitating perfectionism. It may be lack of successful strategies. Or fatigue. Whatever the causes, procrastination then paralysis makes it impossible to move from clear thinking to complete sentences. Anybody love a student like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sd2Q6Fagemg. Here’s help. Continue reading “Term paper time – help for the anxious”

“I’m a bad boy.”

I was incredulous this week and, in an instant, so terribly sad when I asked the students in my class to write three things about themselves they wish every teacher knew about them. One student who has struggled with every kind of esteem and behavior issue in the book wrote on his card: I’m a bad boy.

Continue reading ““I’m a bad boy.””

Learning and teaching

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My current extended-stay teaching assignment is coming to a close. What a journey! I’ve loved the work and the students. I’ve also changed my description of the teacher/student, parent/child interaction from “teaching and learning — adults and children teaching and learning from each other” – to learning and teaching.

This column is Virtues II, in two stories.

Continue reading “Learning and teaching”

Crying in the cart

woman picking out produce

Who hasn’t done it? – You’re tired, the kids are tired, but you need bread and bananas and wearily head to the store. The experience can either bring stress and sadness or build relationships. Here are tips for your trip, and a suggestion for the rest of us.

Continue reading “Crying in the cart”

Same seats ~ On settling in before stepping out

I began a short-term teaching assignment this week in five public school classes. I put the chairs in a circle and didn’t make seating charts so I could watch the students come in, choose their spots, make their alliances, and figure out the lay of the land in their own ways.

“Sit anywhere,” I said at the door on the first day. Continue reading “Same seats ~ On settling in before stepping out”